A Bodey in Motion

Building momentum, one step at a time

Quick Hits: Give responsibly. Shut down the negative voice. Ethiopian kids with tablets.

  • No boogeymen here. That old tree sure casts a funny shadow though, doesn't it?One of the benefits to getting your finances under control is the opportunity to give generously. However, your giving is a resource that needs to be managed, too. You can’t just give to every organization with their hand out without checking them out first. Tony Morgan recently published a list of ten things that people will want to know before they will give to your church, but I think you can turn them around to make great guidelines for the giver to use before donating to any charitable organization. How will your giving make a difference? How will the resources you give be used? What is the vision of the organization? How can you get further involved? How transparent is the organization? Don’t give blindly.
  • Pessimism has always tempted me. Out loud, I’d use the word “realist” but, deep down, I had made Murphy my patron saint. It’s taken a lot of work to change my mindset, and to recognize, by and large, our world and my life just keep getting better, not worse. The biggest part of that has been to shut down that fear-filled, negative voice before it can convince me otherwise. Give yourself a chance to see what’s good around you. There aren’t boogeymen around every corner.
  • How’s this for an education experiment? The One Laptop Per Child project wanted figure out ways to encourage the children of countries with little or no education infrastructure to start teaching themselves. So, they delivered some boxes of tablets to two villages in Ethiopia, taped shut, with no instructions whatsoever. Within five months, the children had begun to learn English and even circumvented some of the security settings on the tablets. How could we implement something like that here in America? Education has to get beyond memorizing facts and procedures, and move on to inspiring children to constantly be learning.

October 5, 2013 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Quick Hits: Give responsibly. Shut down the negative voice. Ethiopian kids with tablets.

Quick Hits: Teach kids about money. After they put down the game controller. A camp stove that charges your cell phone.

  • Return of the Quick HitsBack when I was growing up as a, my education regarding sex was made up of one uneasy lecture by my mother, a surprisingly dull sex-ed lesson in the fifth grade, and almost a decade of juvenile conversations with boys my own age who had no idea what they were talking about. Believe me, this produced laughable and shameful results in a number of ways. Still, all of that was better than my education regarding money. Strangely, among my young friends, the topics of economics and investing never came up. My school made us all complete a lesson on how to fill out a checkbook. (How useful is that in the age of Debit cards and Amazon.com?) And my parents had most of their money fights in private. In both cases, a bad education led to bad decisions and difficult consequences. Stop it. You need to know the secrets of talking to your kids about money.  (And sex, too, but I’m not going to Google ‘children’ and ‘sex’ in the same sentence anytime soon.)
  • It’s been said that it takes about 10,000 hours of practice to master a skill. The sad thing is that by the time they’ve graduated high-school, most teenagers have spent 10,000 hours playing video games. Now, that sounds bad, and I’m sure that we can argue that a life spent glued to a screen would lack some very necessary elements. But we need to be careful not to throw out the good with the bad, because there are some benefits to your child being a gamer.
  • I’ve started camping more since my son joined the scouts, which means I’ve had to start buying more and more camping gear. We now have a tent, some sleeping bags, a heavy tarp and a camping cooler. With more and more of the basics out of the way, it’s time to start looking for some camping toys. I am sorely tempted to get a BioLite CampStove, because it would be so cool to charge my crappy cell phone while cooking dinner on a vortex of flame using only a pile of twigs. Great price tag, too.

June 3, 2013 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Quick Hits: Jesus was dirty. PhDs receiving welfare. Fredric Wertham, lying bastard.

  • The horror...of lying psychiatristsEarlier this year, I came upon an article which I think does a great job of describing the “fully man” side of Jesus. The man Jesus wasn’t walking around clean-cut with a halo over his head. He was dirty and calloused. His family suffered when times were tough. He might even have had dysentery. Painting a more profoundly human picture of Jesus as a man doesn’t weaken him as a Savior. How much more did he have to live fully in the providence of the Father as that final act of sacrifice was played out? As ‘fully God’ he knew what had to happen, and he was still ‘fully man’ enough to ask if the cup could pass from him. It’s just astonishing.
  • If you are half the comic book geek that I am, you know the name Fredric Wertham. He was the crusading author of the book Seduction of the Innocent which asserted that children were more likely to engage in violence, sex, drug use, etc. when they regularly read about it in crime, superhero and horror comic books. His work basically led to the creation of the Comics Code Authority which effectively neutered the quality of comic book stories for the better part of half a century. Well, it turns out old Freddie relied on untrue revisions, distortions, and omissions when he presented the evidence that eventually led to the publication of his 1953 text that started it all. The lying bastard.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Quick Hits: Jesus was dirty. PhDs receiving welfare. Fredric Wertham, lying bastard.

The Mindset of Education Hacking

Watch this TEDx talk by Logan LaPlante.


[via Make]

First of all, this is a solid eleven minutes by a remarkable young man. At 13 years old, he has a clearer vision of his future, and how to educate himself to be ready for that future, than most of the hundreds of people who sit in cubicles around me every day at work do. His parents deserve huge praise for raising him with such a creative spirit and drive to learn.

I look at a kid like Logan, and I can’t help but see a revolution coming in education over the next decade. Choice has become the word of the day. The status quo is being abandoned for new options, and minds are flourishing. Classrooms look more like Starbucks, and the curriculum is hacked together using the material and opportunities available, and in an age where information can be accessed with just a few keystrokes, there are a lot of materials and opportunities available.

That future probably doesn’t make everyone excited. There are a lot of tough questions that still need to be answered. The status quo is well entrenched. But every problem is an opportunity to improve. So, I’m looking forward to it, and I bet Logan is, too.

It’s all about the mindset.

March 7, 2013 Posted by | Marriage and Family, Past and Future, Politics and Other Insects | , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Mindset of Education Hacking