A Bodey in Motion

Building momentum, one step at a time

Quick Hits of the Week

  • Being a politically active Christian can equal an open door to some of the worst kinds of sin. Not worst because they’re extra grotesque or heinous, but because they’re the ones that are pernicious and go unchallenged. “Not only are believers excused for their political indiscretions, but they are often applauded for committing them.” It’s time for us to stop living the lie that every Christian follows one political party. We each have been formed differently and are moved by different kinds of pain and injustice. We should each follow those ways that God has called us, while finding common ground with each other in the church.
  • Bicycles became popular after the automobile did. That seems backwards (as simple, man powered locomotion should have preceded the complex combustion engine) until you realize that for bicycles to be popular they need smooth roads and inflated rubber tires, both of which were brought on by the advent of the automotive age. The lesson is that inventions and innovation become accepted and popular spontaneously, when the world is ready for them. We shouldn’t look for inventions before their time. What does that say about new energy technologies?

Is there something valuable or important or cool or funny or weird or awesome out there I missed this week? I can’t hit it all, but you should let me know about it by dropping me a line or sharing it in the comments below! I’d appreciate the heads up.

September 20, 2012 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Quick Hits of the Week

Quick Hits of the Week

  • If you’re employed, what is it exactly that you do? Do you build widgets? Do you sell stuff? How would you describe your everyday work? Now, here’s the important question: How is your everyday work serving people? Dan Rockwell wants us to remember that the only reason we’re in business is to serve. If you can’t immediately see how the work you do serves others, then you need to take some time and figure it out. More importantly, if you can’t figure out how your work serves others, then you need to find work that does.
  • In the last couple of months, we’ve lost Sheriff Taylor,  Lt. Commander McHale, and Corporal Newkirk. That also means that we’ve lost Ben Matlock (Atlanta’s greatest criminal defense attorney), Dominic Santini (co-pilot of human civilization’s crowning achievement), and the most kissy-faced game-show host ever. I don’t like focusing on death, but it’s hard not to take note of the passing of television legends like these.
  • I’m a big fan of individuals creating and innovating. Looking at old materials in new ways, or putting a fresh spin on an old concept. So, it makes sense that the work being done by UpCycle Living would get my attention. Taking shipping-crates and turning them into affordable homes. Providing relief for Haiti. Not to mention, making a splash right in my own city. The engineer in me is busy assembling shipping-crates into different configurations in my head to see what kind of weird but interesting home designs could be created. The burgeoning financial coach in me wants to warn you not to buy one unless you are dead set on making a statement instead of an investment. These are a niche market with the potential resale value of a mobile home. I still liked them on Facebook, though.

Is there something valuable or important or cool or funny or weird or awesome out there I missed this week? I can’t hit it all, but you should let me know about it by dropping me a line or sharing it in the comments below! I’d appreciate the heads up.

July 12, 2012 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Quick Hits of the Week

    1. Make sure that you’ve done every reasonable thing in your power to not get one. The economic bubble in education loans is huge, and you don’t want to be a part of that statistic if at all possible. You can attend college without going into debt. I did. As Sangl writes, you should consider community college for the first couple of years, and look to less well known schools as money saving alternatives.
    2. Don’t allow anyone to cosign a loan for you. Go read Proverbs 17:18, and then stop anyone who’s trying to do something stupid to “help” you. Remember that if you can’t repay the loan, they’ll have to. If you spend time now to think about how that will make you feel then, it should stop you from ever saying yes.
    3. Your total amount in loans should not be more than the entry level salary in the field you are studying. Here’s a wake-up call: If you don’t roughly know what that number is, then you shouldn’t be going into that field (let alone borrowing money to go into that field). Do some research and know what kind of careers (and salaries) you could have with the degree you’re after. Do not let your children go into their education blind, or else they might come out of it poor.
  • Last week, there was a lot of hulabaloo when the President finally spoke about his unsurprising (and hardly unparalleled) support for homosexual marriage. I happen to agree that homosexuals need equal treatment under the law, which you might find strange considering I’m a Christian, and I do consider homosexuality a sin. (Of course, so is pre-marital sex, adultery, and pornography, and none of those are illegal.) If you’re looking for information on how a real follower of Christ should respond to homosexuality, I couldn’t recommend a better starting place than this collection of articles and videos about how to respond to the debate as a Christian by my pastor (and friend) Josh Reich. Some very thought provoking stuff behind that link, though, so don’t click if you’re afraid to be challenged.
  • A month ago, I mentioned that you should get better acquainted with the practice of civil asset forfeiture. Here is an excellent example of what I was referring to. George Reby, a man who had the audacity of carrying cash for a large purchase, had his money confiscated by a Tennessee police officer because, and I quote the officer involved, “he couldn’t prove it was legitimate.” In hindsight, I suspect that Reby would agree that he made two mistakes. First, he had no reason to answer the officer’s question regarding the amount of money he was carrying – in fact he had the right not to. Second, he shouldn’t have consented to a search without a warrant – because you should never consent to a search without a warrant.

May 17, 2012 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Quick Hits of the Week

  • Over at Michael Hyatt’s blog, Russ Crosson guest posts an interesting question: What would extending your retirement plans make possible? We sort of take for granted that sixty-five equals retirement in this country, but that’s not necessarily going to hold true forever, and it probably shouldn’t. Besides, if you’re doing work that you love (And if you’re not, why not?) why would you want to stop just because you’ve reached some arbitrary age?
  • So, Dan Pearce of Single Dad Laughing has penned a very heartfelt rant about religion, love, sin, and judgement. There are points that he makes that I don’t agree with (sin isn’t a personal thing, at all) but I completely agree with the spirit of what he is saying. As a Christian, love is how I’m called, by Jesus, to live. Even if you’re gay. He even calls Christians to love their enemies.
    I’m going to climb up on my soapbox for a second. Why do we expect people who haven’t chosen to follow Jesus to all behave like Christians? Especially when we don’t? And more importantly, why do we keep passing laws to force them (ultimately at gunpoint) to act the way we believe? Do we really think we can bring them to the cross through legislation?  How arrogant of us. So, I don’t vote “Christian values” anymore. I just do my best to live them with mercy, humility, and love.
    I hope that Dan’s friend Jacob would feel welcome at my church. I hope that we’d love and welcome him.
  • I’m a huge fan of the work Lenore Skenazy does over at Free-Range Kids. I don’t know if it’s the fear of litigation, or ever-present (but hardly realized) stranger danger that drives our culture to extreme risk-avoidance, but it concerns me. It’s not healthy to constantly take precautions against what might occur. For example, just in time for Easter: Beware of Palm Sunday.

April 5, 2012 Posted by | Quick Hits and Links | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Quick Hits of the Week